Though this is the origin of the phrase, Durocher's remark was specific to the context of baseball, and indeed to the context of that set of players, rather than intended as generally applicable to male/female relationship dynamics or in any other context and his allegation of a cause-and-effect relationship between being nice and finishing last was at most merely implicit – it can also be interpreted as "Nice guys, but they will finish last", rather than "all nice guys finish last".Simplistically, the term "nice guy" could be an adjectival phrase describing what appears to be a friendly, kind, or courteous man.

Leon Kass, respected author, professor and bio-ethicist, puts words to our worst fears in this second excerpt from a three-part series. Reading romantic subtext into completely normal communication?

Though it's discouraging news, being able to expose the problem is the first step toward finding a solution. Maybe you've been through a breakup but you can't stop thinking about your ex.

Dawkins was misinterpreted by many as confirming the "nice guy finishing last" view, but refuted the claims in the BBC documentary Nice Guys Finish First.

The "nice guys finish last" view is that there is a discrepancy between women's stated preferences and their actual choices in men.

popular culture and dating advice "suggest that women claim they want a 'nice guy' because they believe that is what is expected of them when, in reality, they want the so-called 'challenge' that comes with dating a not-so-nice guy." Urbaniak & Kilmann write that: "Although women often portray themselves as wanting to date kind, sensitive, and emotionally expressive men, the nice guy stereotype contends that, when actually presented with a choice between such a 'nice guy' and an unkind, insensitive, emotionally-closed, 'macho man' or 'jerk,' they invariably reject the nice guy in favor of his 'so-called' macho competitor." Another perspective is that women do want "nice guys," at least when they are looking for a romantic relationship.

Desrochers (1995) suggests that "it still seems popular to believe that women in contemporary America prefer men who are 'sensitive,' or have feminine personality traits." Women have differing opinions about whether "nice guys finish last" sexually or not.

If she fails to read their secret feelings, Nice Guys become embittered and blame her for taking advantage of them and their niceness.

The site is particularly critical of what they see as hypocrisy and manipulation on the part of self-professed Nice Guys.

Some women, however, emphasized more negative aspects, considering the 'nice guy' to be boring, lacking confidence, and unattractive." The "jerks" were also divided into two categories, "as either confident, attractive, sexy, and exciting or as manipulative, unfaithful, disrespectful of women, and interested only in sex." These studies also cite other research on heterosexual attraction that does not mention the "nice guy" term.