The letter attacked feminist social media campaigns like #Me Too and its French equivalent #Balancetonporc (Call out your pig) for unleashing this 'puritanical... Pictured: Deneuve in 1965Oscar-nominated Deneuve, 74, is best known internationally for playing a bored housewife who spends her afternoons as a prostitute in Luis Bunuel's classic 1967 film, 'Belle du Jour'.

Deneuve has made no secret of her annoyance at social media campaigns to shame men accused of harassing women.'I don't think it is the right method to change things, it is excessive,' she said last year, referring to the #Me Too hashtag.

It’s super quick to join – you simply upload some photos and an optional bio, set your age and distance preferences, and away you go, swiping left or right on potential suitors.

You create your profile through Facebook and can also link your Instagram and Spotify accounts if you like, set your preferences, then scroll down through your options.

The people you’ve crossed paths with most recently will be at the top, meaning if you go on during your lunch-break you’ll inevitably happen upon your colleagues.

And as for Tinder, sure, it can be used for swiftly finding a one-night stand, but there are If your life is too busy to squeeze in the time-consuming intricacies of a longer-term relationship, or you're just looking for a little low-stakes fun tonight, you need a quick, surefire way to find a quality fling.

Dance clubs and dive bars may have worked in the '90s, but now, even if you’re out, your phone is a much easier way to find someone to "watch Netflix and chill" with (especially someone you won’t regret tomorrow).

The women claimed that the 'witch-hunt' that has followed the accusations now threatens sexual freedom.'Rape is a crime, but trying to seduce someone, even persistently or cack-handedly, is not - nor is men being gentlemanly a macho attack,' explained the letter, which was published in the daily Le Monde.'Men have been punished summarily, forced out of their jobs when all they did was touch someone's knee or try to steal a kiss,' said the letter, which was also signed by Catherine Millet, author of the hugely explicit 2002 bestseller 'The Sexual Life of Catherine M'.

Men had been dragged through the mud, they argued, for 'talking about intimate subjects during professional dinners or for sending sexually charged messages to women who did not return their attentions.'The letter attacked feminist social media campaigns like #Me Too and its French equivalent #Balancetonporc (Call out your pig) for unleashing this 'puritanical... It claimed that 'legitimate protest against the sexual violence that women are subject to, particularly in their professional lives', had turned into a witch-hunt.'What began as freeing women up to speak has today turned into the opposite - we intimidate people into speaking "correctly", shout down those who don't fall into line, and those women who refused to bend' to the new realities 'are regarded as complicit and traitors.'The signatories - which included a porn star-turned-agony aunt - claimed they were defending sexual freedom, for which 'the liberty to seduce and importune was essential'.

We set ourselves the challenge of trying as many as we could over the course of six weeks.

We have been on many dates and our phone has been pinging with notifications non-stop (trying to keep conversations going with lots of different men is actually quite the commitment – some dating apps are high-maintenance.) All the apps allow you to search for men, women or both, with all of them available on i OS devices, most on Android and some for Windows Phone, too. Tinder: Free Possibly the best-known dating app of them all, Tinder is most people’s first port-of-call when entering the world of dating apps.

Read on to see which free dating apps made our list.