This is especially true given that the article itself is about the way that false ideas spread by people never double-checking their beliefs.

It seems to me that if you believe in an epidemic of falsehood so widespread that the very ability to separate fact from fiction is under threat, it ought to inspire a state of CONSTANT VIGILANCE, where you obsessively question each of your beliefs.

The sources of inspiration for my sculpture are the inherent properties in materials and processes as well as everyday naturalistic phenomena.

Second, Nyhan & Reifler’s work on the backfire effect is probably not true.

The original study establishing its existence failed to replicate (see eg Porter & Wood, 2016).

First, the article makes the very strong claim that “facts are toothless” – then tries to convince its readers of this using facts.

For example, the article highlights a study by Nyhan & Reifler which finds a “backfire effect” – correcting people’s misconceptions only makes them cling to those misconceptions more strongly. But how is this different from all of those social science facts to which he believes humans are mostly impervious?

Forms are merely a method of shadow boxing where the practitioner simulates a defense against more than one attacker.

The "Dance of Death", as many masters have named forms, is a series of blocks and counter attacks which are designed to suppress physical aggression.

Important truths are often stale and dull, and it is easy to manufacture new, more engaging claims.

And giving people more facts can backfire, as those facts provoke a defensive reaction in someone who badly wants to stick to their existing world view. “We’re in a pretty scary and dark time.” He admits he has no easy answers, but cites some studies showing that “scientific curiosity” seems to help people become interested in facts again.

In Korea, the presidential Protective Forces are all trained in karate and several other nations are presently adopting the art into the training programs of their armed forces.

Karate as an Art Through the coordination of control, balance, and techniques in karate forms, karate is regarded as a beautiful and highly skilled art.

Yet Harford writes an entire article about a worldwide plague of false beliefs without mustering enough vigilance to see if the relevant studies are true or not.